Guessing at the Deadman too Late

Guessing at the Deadman too Late is a mixed-media treatment of the juncture between heritage and mortality. Created during a 6-month exchange at the Universität der Künste Berlin in 2017, Guessing at the Deadman too Late explores the narrativisation of a series of documents pertaining to the fate of my great Uncle Eric Douglas Williams, an RAF bomber pilot who perished during the infamous ‘1000 bomber raids’ across Germany during World War II . A relic Whitley Bomber exhaust, service records, letter correspondence and a custom projection device attempt to convey the story of a ten-year stint in a swamp in Lower Saxony, Germany. The video, sound and a sculptural accompaniment were installed in the darkened space of Kaskl Gallery in Lichtenberg, Berlin; itself a target of the Allied Forces’ 1000 Bomber Raids. 

Guessing at the Deadman too Late explores notions of technology, family, and broken narratives.

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Bomber exhaust stub, red gel, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Bomber exhaust stub, red gel, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Leitz Epidiascope modified to project Full HD video, Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Bomber exhaust stub, red lights, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Leitz Epidiascope modified to project Full HD video, Armstrong Whitworth Whitley Bomber exhaust stub, red lights, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Leitz Epidiascope modified to project Full HD video, assorted Royal Air Force personal service records, red lights, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Leitz Epidiascope modified to project Full HD video, satellite imagery of town of Emen in Lower Saxony Germany, red lights, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Leitz Epidiascope modified to project Full HD video, assorted Royal Air Force personal service records, red lights, Bryden Williams, 2017.

Leitz Epidiascope modified to project Full HD video, assorted Royal Air Force personal service records, red lights, Bryden Williams, 2017.